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20121110
20121110
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
a death in the family. the "boston globe" said they had fireworks ready to go. why did they think they were going to win? they had a fundamentally different view of the elect tort. when the public polls came out they looked at these polls and said these polls have too many democrats. there's no way this president will be able to build up the enthusiasm that way. there are a lot of polls that were pretty close. and this person said that -- they said it was inconceivable. we thought there's no way he's going match his 2008 turnout with minorities and young voters an we really didn't think he would increase it. so what happened overall is, the president did worse with white voters but white voters were the same share of the elect tort. but he did far better with african-americans, latinos an young voters because the romney campaign had sort of was looking -- they changed their data. they done their internal polling based on a smaller number of democrats turning out. they thought things were going well. they had a lot of enthusiasm at their rallies. this is what led them to believe th
. >> laura: in the last three days. everyone from boeing, to cat pillar, lock keyed harr continue, boston scientific, these are thousands of jobs if you add them all up. >> yeah. >> laura: what's going on here. a lot of them citing obama care because of the implementing cost of that. >> nothing related to the election of the president should be a reason why anybody is going through layoffs. it's not like it was a surprise that the president could have won re-election on tuesday. that should have been something that people maybe put a part of their first alert forecast for a long time. and anybody who needs to lay off workers right now, they had systemic problems long before tuesday. >> laura: businesses aren't making legitimate business decisions exside technology, bristol myers. >> they might be legitimate business decisions but it's not because of the results of the election. come on. >> laura: some of them are actually saying it's the result of the election. >> they may be saying it to absolve them of their own i how the business has or has not grown, really come on. >> laura: you thin
to play the role of leader of the republican party. the boston globe reported that mr. romney is likely to move to la jolla, california, to spend more time with his car, presumably. but in his short time as leader of the republican party, when he was their presidential nominee, he made leadership decisions about the party. about what the party's like. about what the party looks like to the rest of the country. he made leadership decisions particularly in terms of who he would dignify with his embrace. who among everybody in the republican party, he, mitt romney, leader of the party, would privilege. who he would elevate. he elevated guys like chris cobach. the republican guy who wrote arizona's papers please immigration law. he was mitt romney's immigration adviser. he made and then kept as his national campaign chairman a man named john sununu who called president obama lazy and not very bright and said president obama needs to, quote, learn how to be an american. mitt romney's national campaign chairman. mr. romney also elevated and dignified by his presence, i'm sorry to have to say
in the edwards school in boston, i use these examples because there are examples where we see things work, then let's use it to engage kids. we know if kids are engaged in music, they don't drop out. we know if you actually figure out what will spark an interest in kids whether it's robot particulars, for me it was civics because i was a social studies teacher, arts, physical education, sports, if you spark an interest in an add less sent, they'll stay. >> i'll go a step further. it seems like there was a time, randi, where parents were at fault. the schools are doing what they can, now it's parents, parents, parents. now it's teachers. they're insufficient, inadequate. we can't have them making living wages or any of those kinds of things. >> right. really, really important but we're going to bash them and we don't want to hear their voice. >> it feels like not only do you need these kinds of things to keep students engaged, but teachers in order to feel excited and make a difference, you can't have 50 kids in a classroom and be teaching to a standardized test and feel at all points like
have a sense of place. so we're talking from new orleans to new delhi, from bangkok to boston, across the world we're looking for those places that you kind of want to keep to yourself but you know you have to share. >> and we're not talking just the five stars, the white linen restaurants. we're talking your food trucks, your greasy spoons, all of them? >> i'm thinking brasseries but also food trucks, as you said, street food stalls, kabob stands, anything that you love. when you think about what is that one meal that i want to have in that destination that really signifies the place, that's what we're talking about. we want people to feel that hometown pride, whether it's a place they live or travel to and they know the secret spot so we can get everybody out of their hotel rooms so they're not having necessarily a cold room service burger and they're experiencing the place. because after all when you're in a restaurant that really is a local place, that's when you're really going to have a sense of place and really feel like you're experiencing that destination. >> absolutely. i un
on the appeals court in boston. he is from portland and have been backed by both republican senators. he was part of what they call thurmond's rule. >> thurmond-leahy rule. >> angus king, from maine, claiming the party alignment is up for grabs. his initial request is he would align with whatever party agreed to push for essentially doing away with the current filibuster rules. harry reid made clear he is not willing to go that far. i know still think angus king will align with a democrat. he endorsed obama. >> and he said yesterday he had conversations with him in the past 24 hours. >> and a phone call with bob corker. the point being that this is the kind of thing that i think a lot of freshmen -- king most vocal among them, they will come to the senate and say let us not spend our first months of this silliness of gratuitous filibuster and blocking a holding everything. let's clear out the underbrush. like you are speaking about, who none of us ever heard of. these are assistant secretaries that one or two senators even care about. >> i think a wrinkle is depending on how much it gets done in
'll be appearing at m.i.t. in boston where i'll be talking about my book and the election. today's show was only a preview. go to our facebook page. >>> i want to finish today's program with a final thought on the election. on tuesday night after the race had been called, the first call i made was to my brother, luke. when i got married in july of 2007 luke had to take a few days off his new job as an obama field day campaign organizer in nevada to take part in the election. that was five years. in the intervening months my brother has spent every single day working for the obama campaign. he's worked in eight states, at times literally living out of clothes in trash bags while putting 87,000 miles on a beat up old white ford pickup truck. 60 to 90 hours a week 52 weeks a year for five years. then from his perch as a nevada state director this time around to get him re-elected. i'm biased, of course, but to me tuesday's victory was luke's victory as much as it was anyone else's. luke and the thousands like him, organizers of every hue and background and creed in states across the nation working
of the continental army goes up to boston, sees that there are black men with guns and knows he is not going to be able to sell this to his brethren in south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually changes his mind when he needed more bodies in his army. we always have to weigh these things. they are not simple black-and-white issues. yes he was a man of his times, he was a man who was part of a society that was utterly dependent upon slavery and he knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration, but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that "don't know much about literature: what you need to know but never learned about great books and authors" >> host: kenneth davis is our guest. every offer we have on in depth we ask some questions of them and we are going to show use those now. we have an hour-and-a-half left in our program and we will be right back with your phone calls. >> host: we are live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city, this is booktv o
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)